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News and developments in education rights law

Curriculum Based Measurement and special education student IEPs

When Performing IEP Progress Monitoring: Part three in series

This is the third article in a series exploring student educational progress and IEP goals. In this article, we help you determine how your special needs child is performing not only against state standards but in his current grade level within the curriculum. We discuss the limitations of curriculum based measurements and outline specific ways to check your child’s progress against IEP goals for written expression, reading fluency and math problem solving.

Make sure you’re receiving adequate IEP progress notes from your child’s teacher. It’s your right.

View article at Students' Rights blog

IEP organization for parents

Where To Find Information About Your Child’s Progress in the IEP: Part two in series

This is the second article in a series exploring student educational progress and IEP goals. In this article, we explain how to find your child’s IEP goals and use them as a benchmark for academic progress. We know how important IEP organization for parents is, so we outline what to bring to your IEP meeting, how to perform a draft IEP versus new IEP comparison, and more.

View article at Students' Rights blog

Parent involvement in IEP process

Is Your Child Making Progress On The IEP?: Part one in series

This is the first article in a series exploring student educational progress and IEP goals. In this article, we explain IEP progress monitoring, identify the sections that contain information about your child’s progress, and provide questions parents should ask when progress reporting information isn’t clear.

Parent involvement in the IEP process has never been more important. Don’t miss out on this series.

View article at Students' Rights blog

Transgender students rights in school

Supreme Court to Hear Transgender School Bathroom Rights Case in March

Fifteen-year-old Gavin Grimm notified his Gloucester, VA high school that he was transitioning to a boy and requested permission to use the boys restroom at school. While his principal complied, town members didn’t believe the transgender teenager should be allowed to use the boys room. Thus began Gloucester County School Board v. GG (Case No. 16-273), a case filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). Get the details on this landmark civil rights and discrimination case.

View article at Students' Rights blog

Special education rights & responsibilities in school

Update: Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District (U.S. Supreme Court Case)

Drew wasn’t progressing in public school. He had been diagnosed with both autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). His disabilities affected cognitive functioning, language skills, social abilities and communication skills. So his parents placed him in a private school, where they said he made “significant” academic and social improvement. They later filed a complaint with the Colorado Department of Education to recover the high cost of tuition at a private school.

The issue before the U.S. Supreme Court in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District is: what level of educational benefit must a child receive under his individualized education program (IEP) to satisfy the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)?

What are the special education rights and responsibilities of the school?

It’s a good idea when filing a due process complaint to consult an experienced special education attorney. This is even more important when seeking private school tuition reimbursement.

View article at Students' Rights blog

IDEA educational benefit requirement through an IEP

What Is the Meaning of Educational Benefit Under the IDEA?

In the case of Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District involving a young boy with multiple diagnoses who was floundering in public school, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit found that the school district had satisfied the IDEA’s educational benefit requirement through an individual education plan (IEP).

However, other Courts of Appeal (in the Third and Sixth Circuits) have set the bar higher by requiring a “meaningful educational benefit” rather than just “some educational benefit”.

Which means that in some parts of the country, special education rights can look very different than in others.

In August, the Solicitor General asked the U.S. Supreme Court to accept the case and answer this crucial question: what is meant by “an educational benefit”?

View article at Students' Rights blog

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